Curatorial Research Bureau
As YBCA celebrates its twenty-fifth anniversary, it looks back at the artists and curators who have contributed to its longest-running exhibition, Bay Area Now.

The Curatorial Research Bureau hosts a panel of key voices who can speak personally to the triennial’s legacy of resilience, creativity, and connection: Renny Pritikin, Bay Area Now founder and former YBCA curator; Weston Teruya, an Oakland-based artist featured in Bay Area Now 6; Susie Kantor, YBCA associate curator of visual art and Bay Area Now 8 co-curator; and panel moderator Qianjin Montoya.

Bay Area Now was conceived as an art-based support system focused on local makers. Since then, it has built vital networks for artists and art spaces, and offers not only gallery space but institutional support as a champion of our multi-voice Bay Area arts ecosystem. By examining the histories of local art practices, exhibition making, and institutional evolutions through the lens of Bay Area Now, this conversation offers informative context and a critical look at how our unique artist communities have responded to the challenges of living and creating in the Bay Area over the last two decades.

This program is organized by Qianjin Montoya, a San Francisco–based independent curatorial researcher and graduate of CCA’s curatorial practice program.

Please note that seating inside the Curatorial Research Bureau (CRB) is limited and RSVP via Eventbrite does not guarantee entry. Seating is first come, first serve.

Call + Response is an open invitation to cultural producers in fields of design, architecture, humanities, civic affairs, urban planning, and more who want to connect with Curatorial Research Bureau to insert their ideas into the public realm for dialogue. The format speaks to a long history of democratic participation, projecting thoughts and ideas in public gatherings where speaking and listening—call and response—are equally valued as essential parts of public discourse.

Artist Bios

 

Renny Pritikin

Renny Pritikin was born in New York and holds a BA from New School College, New York, and an MA in interdisciplinary arts from San Francisco State University. He was codirector, then director, of New Langton Arts in San Francisco from 1979 to 1992; chief curator at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts from 1992 to 2004; director of the Nelson Gallery and Fine Arts Collection at UC Davis from 2004 to 2012; and chief curator at the Contemporary Jewish Museum, San Francisco, from 2014 to 2018. Career highlights include a lecture series in Japanese museums as a guest of the State Department in 1995; receiving a Koret Israel Prize that same year and traveling extensively in Israel; curating the US contribution to the Ecuador Bienal in Cuenca in 2002, selecting the work of Don Ed Hardy; and a 2003 Fulbright Fellowship to lecture in museums throughout New Zealand. Pritikin was a senior adjunct professor in the Graduate Program in Curatorial Practice at California College of the Arts from its inception in 2003 until 2015. He gave early support to such noted artists as Nayland Blake, Nancy Rubins, Fred Tomaselli, Barry McGee, Margaret Kilgallen, Chris Johanson, and many others. He is known for bringing work from popular culture into the museum context, and has curated retrospectives of the work of auto customizer Ed “Big Daddy” Roth, tattoo artist and painter Don Ed Hardy, futurist and Blade Runner designer Syd Mead, and magician and historian Ricky Jay. He is currently working on a memoir and curating two exhibitions for the Contemporary Jewish Museum for 2020.

 

Susie Kantor

Susie Kantor is the associate curator of visual art at YBCA. She holds an MA in art history with a focus on seventeenth-century Dutch painting from New York University, Institute of Fine Arts, and a BA in art history and political science from Wellesley College. Her curatorial projects include Bay Area Now 8 (co-curated with Lucía Sanromán and Martin Strickland), Tania Bruguera: Talking to Power / Hablándole al Poder (2017) (co-curated with Lucía Sanromán), Won Ju Lim: Raycraft Is Dead (2015), Kevin Cooley: Golden Prospects (2015), and Work in Progress: Investigations South of Market (2015), and she served as the coordinating curator for the traveling exhibition Radical Presence: Black Performance in Contemporary Art (2015). Prior to YBCA, she held positions at the Asian Art Museum, San Francisco, and at Richard L. Feigen & Co., New York.

Weston Teruya

Weston Teruya is a Honolulu-born, Oakland-based artist who has exhibited at the Mills College Art Museum, Oakland; Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco; Kearny Street Workshop, San Francisco; Longhouse Projects and the New York City Fire Museum, New York; and Atlanta Contemporary Art Center. He has received public art commissions from the San Francisco and Alameda County Arts Commissions. In 2019 Teruya will exhibit at the Mills College Art Museum and have a solo exhibition at the University of Hawaiʻi, Mānoa. He has received grants from Artadia, the Asian Cultural Council, Creative Work Fund, and the Center for Cultural Innovation. He has been an artist in residence at Montalvo Arts Center, Ox-Bow, the de Young, Recology, and Kala Art Institute, and will be at A. Farm in Saigon in 2019.

About the Program Organizer

Qianjin Montoya

Qianjin Montoya is a San Francisco–based independent curatorial researcher. She holds an MA in curatorial practice from California College of the Arts and a BA in art history from UC Berkeley. She was co-curator and program coordinator of her graduate thesis exhibition, Black Light (2017), which took place at the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts and involved discussions on cultural institutions, community building, and creative invention among black artists in the United States. Her contributions to YBCA’s Bay Area Now 8 included a timeline and an essay, “Twenty Years of Bay Area: Legacy of the Locals.” She is a 2018/19 Emerging Arts Professionals (EAP) SF/Bay Area Fellow and has held positions at Jessica Silverman Gallery in San Francisco and One Grand Gallery in Portland, Oregon.